News — Spice

Made With Spicely: LITTLE BELGIANS

Posted by ila nguyen on

  Since we launched our wholesale page, artisanal businesses big and small have been partnering with us. One of these new partners is LITTLE BELGIANS, an artisanal cookie company founded in Berkeley, California in 2013 by Evy Ballegeer. They specialize in speculoos: arguably, the most popular cookie in her native Belgium. It’s thin, crunchy, not too sweet and flavored with dark brown sugar and nine spices including cinnamon, cloves, pepper and cardamom. Following ancient European tradition, these speculoos are made with wooden molds, custom shaped just for LITTLE BELGIANS. Speculoos are made with organic ingredients, local butter and eggs, fair trade...

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Made With Spicely: TROU NORMAND

Posted by ila nguyen on

We are excited to announce that one of our culinary customers, TROU NORMAND in San Francisco, is now open! TROU NORMAND is named after the Norman tradition of drinking Calvados (apple brandy) as a palate cleanser, and the restaurant itself is a celebration of great food and drink. Chef Salvatore Cracco transforms the venerable Mantalitsa pig into over 40 kinds of charcuterie, all made with 100% certified organic spices from SPICELY! We are very honored to be part of the wonderful food here and hope that you will pay them a visit soon. TROU NORMAND140 New MontgomerySan Francisco, CA 94105http://trounormandsf.com/...

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The Flavors Of Za'atar

Posted by Olivia Maki on

    Za'atar (also spelled zaatar) seasoning is a blend of dried herbs, sesame seeds, sumac and salt. It is a traditional, historic and cultural staple of cuisine in the Middle East. Far and away one of Spicely's biggest sellers, za'atar has deep roots in culinary history.   Dating back to the 13th century, the blend changes from region to region and family to family. In Lebanon, the za'atar may have dried orange or lemon zest and in Israel it might include dried dill. The za'atar in Jordan has a higher ratio of sumac, giving it a deep orange color....

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The Vanilla Orchid

Posted by Olivia Maki on

  There are three species of vanilla, all of which grow from a perennial climbing orchid, vanilla planifolia, vanilla tahitensis, and vanilla pompona. All three species originate from the orchid v. planifolia, which is native to Mesoamerica and was used by the Aztecs.   In the 1520s Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés attempted to bring vanilla back to Europe, but failed because the orchid could only be pollinated by a bee that is native to Mexico. It wasn't until 1819 that a method of hand pollination was discovered, which is the method that is still used today.   Until hand pollination was discovered, Mexico was...

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Cinnamon & True Cinnamon

Posted by Olivia Maki on

  Cinnamon is harvested from the bark of Asian evergreen trees that are 25 years or older. There are two types of tree bark that can be used, cinnamon (cinnamomum verum) and cassia (cinnamomum aromaticum). Both have similar flavors but can be distinguished when tasted in comparison.   Cassia is commonly referred to as cinnamon or Saigon cinnamon and is most likely what is available at grocery stores in the United States unless the packaging says otherwise. Cinnamon, also referred to as true cinnamon, ceylon cinnamon, canela or real cinnamon, is more delicate than cassia in both texture and flavor.    Both are...

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